Pit Bull Attack Reminder of Danger

September 22, 2011
By

The attack Tuesday of a young resident – a two-year old – by a pit bull that got away and which sent the Chelsea girl to the hospital reminds us all of the dangers of these dogs, who are trained as fighters and who remain capable of being vicious despite efforts at domesticating them.

The girl who was bitten was sitting with her mother on a front porch on Grove Street minding their own business. The dog got away from a group of teenagers walking the dog and it immediately attacked the child.

Dog lovers and dog rights experts rush to the defense of pit bulls each time there is an attack and the following spate of media articles decrying the danger of pit bulls.

“They aren’t dangerous,” they say. “Thy are a wonderful and loving breed of dog.”

Then they tell us that pit bulls used to be a very popular and gentle breed nationwide before the turn of the last century and that there was never any problem with them.

That was then. This is now.

Pit bulls are a menace, especially the way they tend to be raised in places like Chelsea.

They are most often used in our city as security shields by macho owners who take pleasure in threatening others.

When pit bulls get away from their macho owners, there is the likelihood they will attack the innocent and the very young, as they often tend to do.

Just such a case this week in our city makes all of this apparent and very real.

We must ask ourselves and our public safety people must do the same – what purpose to pit bulls having been trained in a aggressive manner serve?

These animals that attack randomly should be put down lest they should harm others.

  • This dog did exactly what it was created to do: attack a dog-sized being, for no reason.  If a beagle chases a terrified rabbit, no one is surprised. Beagles were bred to chase rabbits. If a novice dog owner complains about his sniffy barking beagle, we all laugh and say “well, you got a beagle!”  Well, you got a pit bull and it bit a child!

    Read the pit bull websites. Many recommend that pits never be left alone with other pets, as there is no way to anticipate when a fight to the death might occur.  Some recommend that pit owners buy and know how to use a break stick , with which to pry open a pit bull’s mouth, to free the victim. Show me another breed website that must offer that advice.  Pit bull websites state that the gameness/determination pits are born with may make them more determined to escape. (great, just great)  Pit bull websites state that pits need strong, dominanat owners.  Now wait, add these two together. A loose dog doesn’t have his strong leader nearby, so what happens sometimes?  Attacks such as this.

    To the pit bull promoters: Even if pits only attacked passing dogs.  You seem to be totally accepting of a pit bull attacking a leashed neighbor dog while she’s out for a walk. So it’s ok with you if someone comes up to your leashed dog and repeatedly stabs or shoots him?  How about this: instead of euthanizing your pit bull with  a needle and drugs, what if they shake him to death, after first impaling him with spikes? Or clamp onto one of his front legs and shake him until his leg is torn from his body. Then let him bleed to death in your arms?  Unpleasant, right?  Those are the last memories that some victim dog’s owners have of their pit-mauled-to-death pet.

  • someone should go find out if that little “poor” girl,

    Spoken like a true pit bull promoter. Blame the child, who was sitting still. 

    When it is an elderly neighbor lady trying to walk thru her yard, it is the woman’s fault because she walked slowly and it frightened the dogs.

    It is always someone else’s fault, isn’t it.  Except when your pit bull attacks, I suspect that suddenly your pit bull will become a lab mix.

  • Even if no humans were ever injured or killed, why would anyone who truly cares about dogs want the instincts of mauling dogs/killing dogs to continue to be bred into dogs?  I can find no pit breeder website that states that “all our dogs are dog friendly, we never breed dog aggressive dogs.”  In fact the opposite is true.  Pits are the “gladiator” and the “warrior” of the dog world. “Dog aggression is what makes a pit a pit.” This thinking is sick.
    Most dogs bark, stand tall, rush and retreat, rush nip and retreat, all to try to chase the trespasser off the territory and avoid a fight.  Except when males fight over a female, in my experience living in a highly-populated-by-loose/stray-dog area in the 70’s, this is normal dog behavior. A chained outside dog or a dog in his own yard NEVER was attacked, let alone chased thru a dog door into his own home to be shredded.  These attacks only began when pit bulls entered the scene. In the 70’s there were NO pit bulls, none in our city, none attended the local dog training club and none came to the veterinarian’s in our area. None!  Yes there were dobes and GSD, but these dogs gave warning long before attacking and rarely attacked other dogs, and when a fight did happen, it often ended without serious injury, especially when dogs were of similar size.  This is no longer the case, since pit bull population has grown.


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